Size and characteristics of the workforce

Workforce

Country 2011 2012 CHANGE
Italy 16,804 16,871 0.4%
Austria 4,996 4,946 -1.0%
Czech Republic 4,711 4,615 -2.0%
France 8,217 8,065 -1.8%
Germany 15,123 14,696 -2.8%
Spain 2,560 2,659 3.9%
Switzerland 3,742 3,743 0.0%
Total 56,153 55,595 -1.0%

At the end of 2012, the total number of Group employees in the Sustainability Report area came to 55,595.

Although there was an overall reduction of 558 employees (-1% compared with 2011), in the various countries there were differing trends as regards the workforce:

  • there was an increase in the number of employees in Spain (+3.9%) because of new hires;
  • there were falls in Austria (-1%), France (-1.8%), the Czech Republic (-2%) and Germany (-2.8%) where restructuring plans have been adopted in some companies with regard to sales staff;
  • the size of the workforce remained largely the same in Italy (+0.4%) and Switzerland (0%).

WORKFORCE CHANGE 2009-2012Based on the trends observed in the last three years, which saw the workforce remain largely unchanged in 2010 and 2011 before reducing slightly in the last year, one can see that, even in an economic context still characterised by uncertainty, stagnation and growing competition, in which structural changes are required to maintain the competitiveness of the business, the Group has been able to keep employment levels practically unchanged.

In addition, in some countries the Group has taken an active role in helping to overcome this period of economic difficulty, particularly in relation to the serious problem of unemployment amongst the young. In France, Generali France has adopted the Apprenticeship Policy which, for the 2011-2013 three-year period, plans to permanently hire 25% of the interns working at the company. Generali has signed a partnership agreement with the Second Change School of Saint-Denis which, through a series of specific re-education and employment programmes, helps the unemployed and unqualified people who leave school early to become part of the working population.

In Austria and Switzerland, to help young people enter the world of employment some Group companies take on interns of between 16 and 18 years of age, giving them the chance to acquire the professional experience they need so they find it easier to get work once they have completed their studies.

 

Workforce by level

CountryManagersMiddle ManagersOffice workersSales Force on payrollOtherTotal
201120122011201220112012201120122011201220112012
Italy 340 334 2,024 2,104 8,578 8,548 5,820 5,857 42 28 16,804 16,871
Austria 57 56 191 187 2,891 2,842 1,842 1,852 15 9 4,996 4,946
Czech Republic 58 56 366 307 3,415 3,481 864 766 8 5 4,711 4,615
France 149 141 3,155 3,229 2,798 2,627 2,115 2,068 0 0 8,217 8,065
Germany 227 231 751 710 10,532 10,655 3,523 3,032 90 68 15,123 14,696
Spain 74 72 352 338 1,327 1,446 797 792 10 11 2,560 2,659
Switzerland 239 254 538 574 2,339 2,277 578 592 48 46 3,742 3,743
TOTAL 1,144 1,144 7,377 7,449 31,880 31,876 15,539 14,959 213 167 56,153 55,595
Incidence % 2.0% 2.1% 13.1% 13.4% 56.8% 57.3% 27.7% 26.9% 0.4% 0.3% 100.0% 100.0%
  • The breakdown of the Group's total workforce by level is not significantly different in terms of the proportion represented by individual levels.
  • There have been many internal promotions as a result of professional growth in Switzerland, where there has been an increase in both the number of managers (+6.3%) and the number of middle managers (+6.7%). In Germany there was a 1.8% rise in the number of managers, while in Italy and France the number of middle managers increased by 4.0% and 2.3% respectively. In the other countries there were falls in both categories, particularly in the Czech Republic where there was a drop in both the number of managers (-3.4%) and middle managers (-16.1%) because of the high staff turnover in this country.
  • At 41.8%, the proportion of managers and middle managers in France remained well above the Group average of 15.5%. The proportion of staff in managerial roles was also above average in Switzerland (22.1%), yet was particularly low in Austria (4.9%) and Germany (6.4%).
  • The proportion of office workers in the Czech Republic (75.4%) and Germany (72.5%) was considerably higher than the Group average (57.3%).
  • There was an increase in the number of office workers in Germany (+1.2%), the Czech Republic (+1.9%) and, in particular, Spain (+9%), due to the recruitment of new staff in the call centres. Conversely, there was a fall in the number of office workers most notably in France (-6.1%) and Switzerland (-2.7%).
  • The number of the sales force on payroll fell by 3.7% overall with peaks in Germany (-13.9%) and the Czech Republic (-11.3%) due to the restructuring plans; conversely, it grew in Switzerland (+2.4%) and, to a lesser degree, in Italy (+0.6%) and Austria (+0.5%).

At the end of 2012 there were 3,998 call centre employees (3,962 in 2011), equivalent to 7.2% of the total workforce and to 12.5% of all office workers. The number of call centre employees grew significantly in Germany (+6%), Spain (+10.5%) and Switzerland (+12.6%), reflecting the fact that a growing number of customer services are also now carried out over the phone. The number of call centre workers is particularly high in Spain, where they represent 33.7% of the Group's total workforce and 61.9% of the office workers, the level at which they are hired. Because of the specific services they provide, the call centres are vitally important to the companies of the Europ Assistance group.

Female workforce by level

CountryManagersMiddle ManagersOffice workersSales Force on payrollOtherTotal
201120122011201220112012201120122011201220112012
Italy 40 40 426 452 4,478 4,469 2,171 2,255 7 6 7,122 7,222
Austria 5 4 40 39 1,578 1,563 233 236 5 3 1,861 1,845
Czech Republic 6 5 143 122 2,161 2,175 781 695 3 1 3,094 2,998
France 39 35 1,653 1,721 1,905 1,800 475 479 0 0 4,072 4,035
Germany 25 28 152 142 5,718 5,757 706 569 45 20 6,646 6,516
Spain 8 7 91 91 741 828 252 252 3 3 1,095 1,181
Switzerland 26 39 123 144 1,381 1,340 25 28 8 13 1,563 1,564
Total 149 158 2,628 2,711 17,962 17,932 4,643 4,514 71 46 25,453 25,361
Incidence % 0.6% 0.6% 10.3% 10.7% 70.6% 70.7% 18.2% 17.8% 0.3% 0.2% 100.0% 100.0
  • On average, women represent 45.6% of the Group's total workforce (45.3% in 2011). The only countries with significant variations on this figure were the Czech Republic and France, where women represent a higher proportion of the local workforce (65% and 50% respectively), and Austria, where this figure is just 37.3%. In Italy, women represent 42.8% of the workforce.
  • In 2012 there was an increase in the number of female managers (+6%) and middle managers (+3.2%) and a fall in the number of female sales force staff on payroll (-2.8%). In terms of office workers - the category which accounts for the overriding majority of the Group's female employees (70.7%) - the figure remained largely unchanged (-0.2%). The concentration of women in the office worker category was significantly above average in Germany (88.4%), Switzerland (85.7%) and Austria (84.7%), whilst in France it accounted for just 44.6%.
  • On average, a third (33.4%) of positions of responsibility (managers and middle managers) are covered by women (32.6% in 2011), with an increase of 92 (+3.3%) compared with 2011. However, the situation varies greatly from one country to the next: in France there is a higher percentage of women in managerial positions (52.1%) than men, and in the Czech Republic this figure is above average (35%); at the same time, in other countries the percentage of women in positions of responsibility is below the average with lows in Austria (17.7%) and Germany (18.1%). The general increase in the number of women in management and middle management positions includes an increase of 64 in France (+3.8%) and an increase of 34 in Switzerland (+22.8%).
  • The percentage of women in Executive/Top Management positions, equal to 8.2%, was largely unchanged.
  • In the call centres the number of female workers, equal to 2,572, fell by 4.6% compared with 2011, with a reduction also in the percentage weight which, despite falling from 68.1% to 64.3%, still accounts for the majority of women employees. This percentage was only below the average in Germany (48.6%) while in all other countries it was above average with peaks in the Czech Republic (80.7%), Switzerland (78.5%) and Italy (69.4%).

The characteristics of the workforce, as described above, show that women still represent a minority of all employees and an even smaller proportion of those in managerial positions due to past recruitment and career-development policies that penalised women. The situation has changed in recent years, however, and is constantly improving.

Workforce by type of contract

CountryFull-time permanent
employees
Full-time fixed-term
employees
Part-time permanent
employees
Part-time fixed-term
employees
Total
2011201220112012201120122011201220112012
Italy 14,492 14,559 541 445 1,471 1,526 300 341 16,804 16,871
Austria 4,359 4,291 0 0 637 655 0 0 4,996 4,946
Czech Republic 3,792 3,720 784 770 116 112 19 13 4,711 4,615
France 6,604 6,473 609 595 994 982 10 15 8,217 8,065
Germany 12,517 11,910 158 246 2,415 2,497 33 43 15,123 14,696
Spain 2,370 2,311 31 60 156 242 3 46 2,560 2,659
Switzerland 3,107 3,056 68 74 539 566 28 47 3,742 3,743
TOTAL 47,241 46,320 2,191 2,190 6,328 6,580 393 505 56,153 55,595
Incidence % 84.1% 83.3% 3.9% 3.9% 11.3% 11.8% 0.7% 0.9% 100.0% 100.0%
  • 95.2% of the workforce in the Sustainability Report area have permanent contracts, a percentage that rises to 100% in Austria. However, France (92.4%) and the Czech Republic (83%) fall below this average. 93.1% of female employees have permanent contracts.
  • There are 7,085 part-time employees, 5.4% up compared with the previous year, and they represent 12.7% of the total (12% in 2011). Germany is one of the countries where the proportion of these workers is highest (17.3%), along with Switzerland (16.4%) and Austria (13.2%), while the Czech Republic has the lowest percentage of part-time employees (2.7%).
  • 87.4% of part-time employees are women, confirmation that this type of contract is a typically female choice: in the Group around one in four women (24.4%) have a part-time contract compared with just 2.9% of men.
  • The Group companies also use temporary or project workers with fixed-term contracts for limited periods to cover peaks of work, one-off projects and temporary staff absences (due to maternity leave, sick leave, etc.), as well as trainees. 127 project workers, 594 temporary workers and 186 trainees - the equivalent of 1.6% of the total workforce - were employed in 2012, 300 of which in Germany, 284 in the Czech Republic and 112 in Italy; 551 of these employees, equal to 60.7%, are women.

The number of Group employees with graduate or postgraduate qualifications continued to increase due to the Group's recruitment policy: for example, only graduates are normally hired in Italy.
In the Sustainability Report area as a whole 32.9% of employees are university graduates (32.1% in 2011), while this figure is much higher in Spain (49.2%), France (46.4%) and Italy (43.0%), and much lower in Austria (12.4%), Switzerland (20.1%) and Germany (20.3%).

Woman/man remuneration

CountryManagersMiddle ManagersOffice workersSales Force on payroll
Remuneration(*)Basic
salary(**)
RemunerationBasic
salary
RemunerationBasic
salary
RemunerationBasic
salary
Italy 0.90 0.92 0.80 1.00 0.84 0.91 0.75 0.86
Austria 0.88 0.86 0.95 0.97 0.69 0.76 0.67 0.81
Czech Republic 0.95 0.88 0.81 0.79 0.74 0.77 0.50 0.53
France 0.97 0.95 0.88 0.89 1.04 1.05 0.77 0.83
Germany 0.85 0.93 0.84 0.90 0.80 0.80 0.73 0.79
Spain 0.80 0.86 0.86 0.97 0.83 0.82 0.86 0.94
Switzerland 0.93 0.93 0.86 0.85 0.75 0.75 0.56 0.56

(*) Annual amount paid by the Group to employees including not only what established by the National Collective Bargaining Agreement by the Company Collective
Agreement, but also any other type of additional remuneration, such as company seniority, overtime work, bonuses, benefit.

(**) Amount concerning just the National Collective Bargaining Agreement, without including any type of additional remuneration

  • The table shows the ratio of the total gross annual remuneration of women to that of men, as well as the ratio of the gross annual basic remuneration of women to that of men for each type of level.
  • In most countries and at most levels, the Group's female employees receive lower gross annual remuneration than their male counterparts, with more noticeable differences among office workers and sales force staff on the payroll. This is mainly due to the fact that women make far greater use of the leave provided for by law following the birth of a child, that they prefer part-time work contracts in order to better balance their family and working commitments, and that they have worked for the company for less time.
  • Furthermore, in general, the differences are less marked at basic salary level, only increasing when additional bonuses, which are often associated with more onerous commitments in terms of working hours and transfers, are factored in. Women find it more difficult to reconcile such commitments with their role in the family.
  • Only in Italy is the basic salary of female middle managers the equivalent of those of their male counterparts. In France, meanwhile, at office worker level women actually receive better remuneration than men thanks to an agreement designed to prevent remuneration discrimination.

In Italy, the gross annual remuneration paid to newly hired office workers (i.e. those at the 4th pay level according to the insurance industry national collective bargaining agreement) at Generali is 15.8% higher compared with the industry average. In France, remuneration is set according to gender: compared with the average remuneration paid for the same role by other companies in the industry, remuneration for new hires at Generali is 4.7% higher for men and 6.7% higher for women.
Meanwhile, in Austria, Germany, the Czech Republic, Spain and Switzerland, the remuneration paid to new administrative staff is generally aligned with the average remuneration paid in the national insurance sector.

Workforce by age bracket

Workforce by age bracket

  • At the end of 2012 the composition of the workforce in terms of age range showed a slight slant towards the older age categories, with a reduction of around a percentage point in the age range up to 34 years and a corresponding increase of a point in the age range above 54 years.
  • 58.9% of the workforce is under 45 (60.4% in 2011); this age bracket includes the largest age range, that of workers between the ages of 35 and 44. The female workforce is younger: 63.9% of women are under 45 years of age and 31.6% are under 35. In Austria and Switzerland there are a total of 68 young people under the age of 18 with apprenticeship contracts, 36 of whom women.
  • The Czech Republic and Switzerland have the highest percentage of staff under the age of 35. The workforce is young in Italy as well: 64.4% of employees (70.3% of women) are under 45, while the over-54's account for just 9.7% of the workforce (7.7% women) following the departures due to retirement in recent years.
  • Conversely, the older age categories are much more substantial in France and in Germany, where the over-45's represent a Group high of 48.9%. In Austria, France and Germany the proportion of over-45's is at its highest, around 41-43% of the female workforce.
  • In the under-35's bracket, there are more women (52.7%) than men; this proportion falls as employees get older, reaching its lowest percentage among the over-54's, where women account for 37.3% of the workforce. As well as showing that women are not discriminated against during the recruitment process, this also suggests that the male and female workforces will be of a more similar size in the future.
  • The average age of the workforce is around 41. The youngest average age (38) is in the Czech Republic, while France has the highest average age (43).
  • 50.6% of managers are in the 45-54 age bracket, while just 1.7% are under 35.

Workforce by seniority of service

Country≤ 2 years3-10 years11-20 years≥ 21 yearsTotal
2011201220112012201120122011201220112012
Italy 3,006 2,675 6,821 6,980 3,810 3,688 3,167 3,528 16,804 16,871
Austria 620 494 1,259 1,227 1,508 1,390 1,609 1,835 4,996 4,946
Czech Republic 1,363 1,320 2,003 1,960 868 777 477 558 4,711 4,615
France 1,858 1,681 1,984 1,937 1,974 2,045 2,401 2,402 8,217 8,065
Germany 1,929 1,651 4,829 4,198 4,803 4,901 3,562 3,946 15,123 14,696
Spain 257 453 973 863 552 525 778 818 2,560 2,659
Switzerland 1,067 1,110 1,439 1,330 721 802 515 501 3,742 3,743
TOTAL 10,100 9,384 19,308 18,495 14,236 14,128 12,509 13,588 56,153 55,595
Incidence % 18.0% 16.9% 34.4% 33.3% 25.4% 25.4% 22.3% 24.4% 100.0% 100.0%
  • The Group's employees are very loyal: almost half (49.8%) have worked for the Group for over ten years and 24.4% for over twenty years.
  • Austrian workers stand out for their long experience in the company with 65.2% having worked for the Group for over ten years and 37.1% for more than twenty. Seniority is also high in France, Germany and Spain, where over half of employees have worked for the Group for more than ten years.
  • Employees with less than 10 years of seniority represent the majority in the Czech Republic (71.1%), Switzerland (65.2%) and Italy (57.2%).
  • Average seniority varies from 15.8 years in Austria to 8.2 years in the Czech Republic.

Turnover

Paese
≤ 3435-54≥ 55Totale
AssunzioniCessazioniAssunzioniCessazioniAssunzioniCessazioniAssunzioniCessazioni
Italia 1.265 970 244 302 6 176 1.515 1.448
Austria 269 164 83 139 2 101 354 404
Francia 866 776 272 367 14 161 1.152 1.304
Germania 661 578 455 536 33 351 1.149 1.465
Repubblica Ceca 695 550 178 350 11 90 884 990
Spagna 302 157 124 125 1 46 427 328
Svizzera 265 246 104 180 6 79 538 505
Totale 4.323 3.441 1.460 1.999 73 1.004 6.019 6.444
  • Of the 538 new hires in Switzerland, 163 relate to BSI, for which no age range details are available.
  • The overall Generali Group average staff turnover rate - calculated as (new hires during the year + contract terminations during the year)/ [(workforce at start of year + workforce at end of year)/2] - is 22.3%. In 2012, on average women accounted for 52.4% of new hires and 49.6% of contract terminations.
  • The positive staff turnover rate, calculated as the total number of new hires as a percentage of the total workforce at the beginning of the year, was 10.7% (12.4% for women, on average).
  • The negative staff turnover rate, calculated as the total number of contract terminations as a percentage of the total workforce at the beginning of the year, was 11.5% and 12.6% for women.
  • The majority of new hires fell into the under-35 category (73.8%), as did the majority of people leaving the company, equal to 53.4% of the total; this scenario was influenced by the termination of fixed-term contracts and the greater propensity among the young to change jobs.
  • The 35-54 age range accounted for 24.9% of new hires and 31% of contract terminations, while among the over-54's there were few new hires (1.3%) in comparison with those whose contracts came to an end (15.6%).
  • In 2012, 1,452 people were hired on short-term temporary contracts and left the Group before the end of the year, 876 of whom women (60.3%).

As regards sick leave, leave following accidents in the workplace and unpaid leave, the rate of absenteeism is calculated as the ratio of the number of days of absence (total absence or for the various reasons identified) to the number of working days in the year (excluding Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays) multiplied by the number of employees at the end of the year.

The average rate of absenteeism in 2012 was 4.6% (5% in 2011). Absenteeism trends differ from one country to the next: France has the highest absenteeism rate (6.5%), followed by Germany (5.1%). Switzerland (2.3%) and Spain (2.3%) have the lowest rates of absenteeism. Italy is below the average with a rate of 4.2%, as are Austria (4.1%) and the Czech Republic (3.8%).

The average rate of absenteeism among women is 5.7% due to the higher average rate of absence for illness (5%) and unpaid leave (0.7%). The female rate of absenteeism ranges from 7% in France to 1.7% in Switzerland.

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Bundeswettbewerb Mathematik, Germania